If you’re a mom, you know that children’s lives these days are not as simple as they used to be. Our kids are trying to meet the high standards of our society. School puts pressure on them to get better grades and does not teach them how to feel worthy and loved.

The digital world pushes them to be like the role models they see on social media, a culture makes them feel not good enough more than ever before.

No wonder so many children develop anxiety and depression.

Now, let’s talk about you, the mom.

You want to raise a child who’s healthy, physically and emotionally, but you struggle to cope with the demands of life yourself. You have your moments when you think you’re a bad mom, especially when you compare yourself to the “perfect” moms you see around you.

As a mother of two adult children, I can assure you that even when they grow up, our children need our emotional support and direction.

How do we support them without being bossy and controlling?

How do we guide them and at the same time let them choose, fail, recover, and learn from their mistakes?

“In today’s rush, we all think too much, seek too much, want too much, and forget about the joy of just being.” —Eckhart Tolle

One of the most effective ways to raise healthy children is to teach them mindfulness.

Just like you, your child is worried about the future: the test they have tomorrow, the sports game they have in two days, and the party they’ll go to over the weekend. Just like you, your child regrets not doing better yesterday, two days ago, last week.

Mindfulness is paying attention to your current experience without judging it. Stress and worry lead to spending too much time on the past and future. It is unhealthy both for us and for our children.

How do you start teaching your child mindfulness?

Here’s a fun and simple way: Incorporate a 5-minute mindfulness pause into your daily routine. Practice it together with your child.

Here is what you do:

  1. Choose a spot, either indoors or outdoors, and sit comfortably.
  2. Set your timer for 5 minutes.
  3. Place one hand on your heart and one hand on your tummy, and take 3 deep breaths.
  4. Pay attention to your 5 senses: what you see, hear, taste, touch, and smell. Gaze at a certain point, listen to the noise around you, place your hands on your body or on an object nearby and pay attention to the texture, temperature, and density of what you touch. Pay attention to the taste in your mouth and what you smell in the present moment.

When the timer goes off, you and your child can share your experiences with each other. Or you can even start teaching your child to journal by letting her write one sentence about her experience in a cute notebook.

In a world of so much “doing,” developing a practice of “being” will make you and your child more relaxed, present, and grounded.

If you are serious about bringing mindfulness to your life and the lives of your children, consider learning to give Reiki to yourself. Once you start a self-Reiki practice, you can also share it with your child. Reiki enriches and enhances any mindfulness practice.

I have been practicing, teaching, living, and loving Reiki since 1996, and it is an inseparable part of my life and the lives of my children.

If this message sparks curiosity, read my previous article about practicing mindfulness and living an intentional life.

Read more and sign up for a class with one of our Reiki Masters in Atlanta or New-York City.

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